Enhancement of sleep stability with Tai Chi exercise in chronic heart failure: preliminary findings using an ECG-based spectrogram method.

Authors:
Yeh GY, Mietus JE, Peng CK, Phillips RS, Davis RB, Wayne PM, Goldberger AL, Thomas RJ.

Reference:
Sleep Med. 2008 Jul;9(5):527-36. Epub 2007 Aug 3.

Objectives:
To assess the effects of a 12-week Tai Chi exercise program on sleep using the sleep spectrogram, a method based on a single channel electrocardiogram (ECG)-derived estimation of cardiopulmonary coupling, previously shown to identify stable and unstable sleep states.

Conclusions:
At 12 weeks, those who participated in Tai Chi showed a significant increase in HFC and significant reduction in LFC, compared to patients in the control group. Correlations were seen between improved sleep stability and better disease-specific quality of life.

Practical Significance:
Tai Chi exercise may enhance sleep stability in patients with chronic heart failure. This sleep effect may have a beneficial impact on blood pressure, arrhythmogenesis and quality of life.

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On-Call Duty Effects on Sleep-State Physiological Stability in Male Medical Interns

Authors:
Yu-Hsuan Lin, Yen-Cheng Ho, Sheng-Hsuan Lin, Yao-Hsien Yeh, Chia-Yih Liu, Terry B. J. Kuo, Cheryl C. H. Yang, Albert C. Yang

Reference:
PLoS One. 2013 Jun 4;8(6):e65072.

Objectives:
To investigate sleep stability decreased in medical interns during on-call duty.

Conclusions:
The medical interns had significantly reduced stable sleep, and displayed increased latency to the first epoch of stable sleep during the on-call night shift, compared to the pre-call and on-call duty-free nights.

Practical Significance:
The medical interns had significantly reduced stable sleep, and displayed increased latency to the first epoch of stable sleep during the on-call night shift, compared to the pre-call and on-call duty-free nights.

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Sleep Quality among Female Hospital Staff Nurses

Authors:
Chien PL, Su HF, Hsieh PC, Siao RY, Ling PY, Jou HJ.

Reference:
Sleep Disord. 2013; 2013: 283490.

Objectives:
To investigate sleep quality of hospital staff nurses, both by subjective questionnaire and objective measures.

Conclusions:
Among the staff nurses, 75.8% (117) had a PSQI score of ≥5 and 39.8% had an inadequate stable sleep ratio.

Practical Significance:
Both subjective and objective measures demonstrated that poor sleep quality is a common health problem among hospital staff nurses.

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The Sleep Quality Recovery of a Snorer's Bed Partner

Authors:
Schramm PJ, Neville AN, Baker D

Reference:
Respiratory Therapy Vol. 5 No. 3 June-July 2010 pg. 39

Objectives:
To demonstrate, through the use of CPC technology, the negative impact of snoring and Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) and the response to PAP initiation the bed partner’s sleep quality.

Conclusions:
Both the snorer and his bed partner’s sleep quality improved significantly with the application of PAP therapy.

Practical Significance:
Proof to a reticent CPAP user of the benefit of CPAP compliance to their bed partner as well as themselves

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